Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
ISSN: 1303 - 2968   
Ios-APP Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
Androit-APP Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
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©Journal of Sports Science and Medicine ( 2016 ) 15 , 704 - 714

Research article
Effects of a High Protein and Omega-3-Enriched Diet with or Without Creatine Supplementation on Markers of Soreness and Inflammation During 5 Consecutive Days of High Volume Resistance Exercise in Females
Sara Hayward1, Colin D. Wilborn1,2, , Lem W. Taylor2, Stacie L. Urbina2, Jordan J. Outlaw2, Cliffa A. Foster2, Michael D. Roberts3,4
Author Information
1 Department of Physical Therapy, Graduate School, and Sport Sciences Department, University of Mary Hardin-Baylor, Belton, TX, USA
2 Human Performance Laboratory, Exercise and Sport Sciences Department, University of Mary Hardin-Baylor, Belton, TX, USA
3 Molecular and Applied Sciences Laboratory, School of Kinesiology, Auburn University, Auburn, AL, USA
4 Department of Physiology and Cellular Biology, Edward Via College of Osteopathic Medicine – Auburn Campus, Auburn, AL, USA

Colin D. Wilborn
✉ The University of Mary Hardin-Baylor, Human Performance Laboratory, UMHB Box 8010, Belton, Texas 76513, USA
Email: cwilborn@umhb.edu
Publish Date
Received: 13-07-2016
Accepted: 14-11-2016
Published (online): 01-12-2016
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ABSTRACT

We examined if two different dietary interventions affected markers of soreness and inflammation over a 5-day high-volume resistance training protocol in females that resistance-trained 8 weeks prior. Twenty-eight females (age: 20 ± 1 yr; body mass: 63.5 ± 1.6 kg, height: 1.67 ± 0.01 m) completed 4 weeks of pre-training (weeks 1-4) followed by a subsequent 4-week training period along with a dietary intervention (weeks 5-8). Dietary interventions from weeks 5-8 included: a) no intervention (CTL, n = 10) b) a higher-protein diet supplemented with hydrolyzed whey protein (50 g/d) and omega-3 fatty acids (900 mg/d) (DI, n = 8), and c) the DI condition as well as creatine monohydrate (5 g/d) (DI+C, n = 10). During week 9, participants resistance-trained for five consecutive days whereby 8 sets of 10 target repetitions at 70% one repetition maximum (1RM) were performed each day for bench press, back squat, deadlift, and hip-thrusters with the intent of eliciting muscle soreness and inflammation. Prior to and 24 h following each of the 5 bouts muscle soreness (DOMS) was assessed via questionnaire, and fasting blood was obtained and analyzed for serum cortisol, interleukin-6 (IL-6) and C-reactive protein (CRP). No group*time (G*T) or time effects were observed for training volume over the 5-d overreaching protocol. Furthermore, no group*time (G*T) or time effects were observed for serum cortisol, IL-6 or CRP, and DOMS actually decreased in all groups 24 h following the fifth day training bout. This study demonstrates that, regardless of protein, omega-3 fatty acid and/or creatine supplementation, 5 days of consecutive resistance training does not alter perceived muscle soreness, training volume, and/or markers of inflammation in novice resistance-trained females.

Key words: Whey protein, creatine monohydrate, muscle soreness, inflammation


           Key Points
  • We examined if two different dietary interventions (higher protein and omega-3 supplementation, or higher protein and omega-3 supplementation with creatine supplementation) affected muscle soreness and inflammation markers over a 5-day high-volume resistance training protocol in females that resistance-trained 8 weeks prior.
  • Neither dietary intervention affected training volume, muscle soreness and inflammation markers over the 5-d consecutive training period.
  • More research is needed in order to determine if the dietary interventions employed herein affects athletes which may experience overreaching-like symptoms over a training season.
 
 
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