Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
ISSN: 1303 - 2968   
Ios-APP Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
Androit-APP Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
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©Journal of Sports Science and Medicine (2017) 16, 239 - 246

Research article
Effects of High Velocity Elastic Band versus Heavy Resistance Training on Hamstring Strength, Activation, and Sprint Running Performance
Donatas Janusevicius1, Audrius Snieckus1, , Albertas Skurvydas1, Viktoras Silinskas1, Eugenijus Trinkunas1, Joan Aureli Cadefau2, Sigitas Kamandulis1
Author Information
1 Institute of Sport Science and Innovations, Lithuanian Sports University, Kaunas, Lithuania
2 Institut Nacional d’Educació Física, Barselona, Spain

Audrius Snieckus
✉ Institute of Sport Science and Innovations, Lithuanian Sports University, Kaunas, Lithuania
Email: audrius.snieckus@lsu.lt
Publish Date
Received: 15-01-2017
Accepted: 22-03-2017
Published (online): 01-06-2017
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ABSTRACT

Hamstring muscle injuries occur during high-speed activities, which suggests that muscular strength at high velocities may be more important than maximal strength. This study examined hamstring adaptations to training for maximal strength and for strength at high velocities. Physically active men (n = 25; age, 23.0 ± 3.2 years) were randomly divided into: (1) a resistance training (RT, n = 8) group, which performed high-load, low-velocity concentric–eccentric hamstring contractions; (2) a resistance training concentric (RTC; n = 9) group, which performed high-load, low-velocity concentric-only hamstring contractions; and (3) a high-velocity elastic band training (HVT, n = 8) group, which performed low-load, high-velocity concentric–eccentric hamstring contractions. Pre- and posttraining tests included hamstring strength on a hamstring-curl apparatus, concentric knee extension–flexion at 60°/s, 240°/s, and 450°/s, eccentric knee flexion at 60°/s and 240°/s, hamstring and quadriceps coactivation, knee flexion and extension frequency in the prone position, and 30-m sprint running speed from a stationary start and with a running start. Knee flexor torque increased significantly by 21.1% ± 8.1% in the RTC group and 16.2% ± 4.2% in the RT group (p < 0.05 for both groups). Hamstring coactivation decreased significantly in both groups. In the HVT group, knee flexion and extension frequency increased by 17.8% ± 8.2%, concentric peak torque of the knee flexors at 450°/s increased by 31.0% ± 12.0%, hamstring coactivation decreased, and running performance over 30 m improved (p < 0.05 for all parameters). These findings suggest that resistance training at high velocities is superior to traditional heavy resistance training for increasing knee flexor strength at high velocities, movement frequency, and sprint running performance. These findings also indicate that traditional training approaches are effective for increasing knee flexor strength and reducing knee extensor coactivation, but this outcome is limited to low and moderate speeds.

Key words: Hamstring muscles, muscle strength, high velocity, resistance training, running, torque


           Key Points
  • Resistance training performed at high load and low velocities increases knee flexor strength and decreases hamstring coactivation, whereas does not change strength at high velocity.
  • Elastic band training at high velocities increases strength and decreases hamstring coactivation, particularly at high muscle velocities.
  • Elastic band hamstring training at high velocities has positive effects on both knee flexors and knee extensors, and these benefits transfer positively to sprint performance.
 
 
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