Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
ISSN: 1303 - 2968   
Ios-APP Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
Androit-APP Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
Views
2411
Download
1275
 
©Journal of Sports Science and Medicine (2023) 22, 84 - 97   DOI: https://doi.org/10.52082/jssm.2023.84

Research article
Does Exercise Modality Matter Affectively? Contrasting Type and Sequence of Moderate-Intensity Continuous Training Versus High-Intensity Interval Training in a Randomized Within-Subject Study
Katja Dierkes1,3, , Inka Rösel2,5, Katrin E. Giel4, Ansgar Thiel1,3, Gorden Sudeck1,3
Author Information
1 Institute of Sports Science, Faculty of Economic and Social Sciences, University of Tübingen, Germany
2 Department of Sports Medicine, University Hospital of Tübingen, Germany
3 Interfaculty Research Institute for Sport and Physical Activity, University of Tübingen, Germany
4 Department of Psychosomatic Medicine & Psychotherapy, University Hospital of Tübingen, Germany
5 Institute for Clinical Epidemiology and Applied Biometry, Faculty of Medicine, University Hospital of Tübingen, Germany

Katja Dierkes
✉ Institute of Sports Science, Faculty of Economic and Social Sciences, University of Tübingen, Germany
Email: katja.dierkes@uni-tuebingen.de
Publish Date
Received: 25-07-2022
Accepted: 24-01-2023
Published (online): 01-03-2023
 
 
ABSTRACT

Over the past two decades, affective determinants of exercise behavior have received increasing attention in research on health promotion and prevention. To date, however, little is known about changes in affective exercise determinants during multi-week training programs in insufficiently active individuals. This applies in particular to the currently discussed advantages and disadvantages of high-intensity interval training (HIIT) compared with moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT) with regard to the affective experience of these two training types (e.g., reduced monotony vs. more aversive response during HIIT), which is important for exercise adherence. Referring to the Affect and Health Behavior Framework (AHBF), this within-subject study investigated changes in affective exercise determinants as a function of training type and sequence consisting of MICT and HIIT. Forty insufficiently active healthy adults (Mage = 27 ± 6 years; 72% women) underwent two 6-week training periods in a randomized sequence (MICT - HIIT vs. HIIT - MICT) within 15 weeks. Pre-post questionnaires and in-situ measurements, during and after a standardized vigorous-intensity continuous exercise session (VICE), were used to assess affective attitude, intrinsic motivation, in-task affective valence, as well as post-exercise enjoyment. These four affect-related constructs were collected before, between, and after the two training periods. Mixed models revealed a significant effect for training sequence (p = 0.011) - but not for training type (p = 0.045; non-significant after Bonferroni alpha adjustment) - on changes in in-task affective valence in favor of the MICT - HIIT sequence. Moreover, no significant training type or sequence effects were found for the constructs of reflective processing: exercise enjoyment, affective attitude, and intrinsic motivation. Therefore, individual-based training recommendations should consider the effects of variety and training sequence to develop tailored interventions that lead to more positive affective experiences - in particular during exercise - and promote the maintenance of exercise behavior in previously inactive individuals.

Key words: Physical inactivity, exercise intensity, affect, enjoyment, intrinsic motivation


           Key Points
  • In-task affective valence was significantly influenced by the training sequence in favor of the MICT–HIIT sequence.
  • No significant training type or sequence effects were found for the constructs of reflective processing examined here: exercise enjoyment, affective attitude, and intrinsic motivation.
  • Individual-based training recommendations should consider effects of variety and training sequence to develop tailored interventions that lead to more positive affective experiences and thus maintenance of exercise behavior in previously inactive individuals.
 
 
Home Issues About Authors
Contact Current Editorial board Authors instructions
Email alerts In Press Mission For Reviewers
Archive Scope
Supplements Statistics
Most Read Articles
  Most Cited Articles
 
  
 
JSSM | Copyright 2001-2024 | All rights reserved. | LEGAL NOTICES | Publisher

It is forbidden the total or partial reproduction of this web site and the published materials, the treatment of its database, any kind of transition and for any means, either electronic, mechanic or other methods, without the previous written permission of the JSSM.

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.