Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
ISSN: 1303 - 2968   
Ios-APP Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
Androit-APP Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
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©Journal of Sports Science and Medicine ( 2004 ) 03 , 56 - 61

Young Investigator Special Issue 1: Research article
Understanding the Role of Behavior and Cognitions in a Group Exercise Setting
Tina L. Shrigley , Kimberley A. Dawson
Author Information
Department of Kinesiology and Physical Education, Wilfrid Laurier University, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada

Tina L. Shrigley
✉ Department of Kinesiology and Physical Education, Wilfrid Laurier University, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada, N2L 3C5.
Email: tshrigley@sympatico.ca
Publish Date
Received: 27-07-2004
Accepted: 13-10-2004
Published (online): 01-11-2004
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ABSTRACT

The first purpose of the present study examined whether individuals with different exercise behaviors (classified by attendance) experienced different or similar cognitive patterns. It was hypothesized that different behavior would lead to different cognitive appraisals. It was predicted that there would be a difference between the three behavioral frequency groups with regard to self-efficacy measures and goal measures. The second purpose of the study was to describe, evaluate and observe whether social factors were associated with participating in exercise in groups. It was hypothesized that those who engage in exercise classes would elicit a social focus. Participants for the study included 39 females who registered in-group fitness classes at a mid-sized university. Attendance over the 10-week course was assessed and participants completed a self-report questionnaire during week seven. The attendance data were used to create 3 exercise frequency groups (regular attenders, sporadic attenders, and dropouts) based on ACSM’s exercise guidelines. Analysis of Variance (ANOVA), means and frequencies were used to describe the data. There were no significant differences on measures of self-efficacy, goal measures, enjoyment, and external motivation among the three groups (all p’s > 0.05). An analysis of the whole group (N=39) discovered a low social focus and high ratings of self-efficacy. Continued research is necessary to investigate the benefit of social support in a group exercise setting, as well as to better understand how self-regulation through self-efficacy and goal factors influences and is influenced by actual behavior.

Key words: Self-efficacy, goal influence, social interaction


           Key Points
  • Exercise behavior did not seem to differentiate individuals in terms of cognitive factors.
  • Results show low social focus and high self-efficacy in group exercise classes.
  • Continued research is needed to better understand how self-regulation through self-efficacy and goal factors influence and is influenced by exercise behavior.
 
 
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