Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
ISSN: 1303 - 2968   
Ios-APP Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
Androit-APP Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
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©Journal of Sports Science and Medicine ( 2014 ) 13 , 252 - 258

Research article
The Influence of Serial Carbohydrate Mouth Rinsing on Power Output during a Cycle Sprint
Shaun M. Phillips , Scott Findlay, Mykolas Kavaliauskas, Marie Clare Grant
Author Information
Abertay University, Division of Sport and Exercise Sciences, Dundee, Scotland, UK

Shaun M. Phillips
✉ Abertay University, Division of Sport and Exercise Sciences, Graham Building, Bell Street, Dundee DD11HG, UK
Email: S.Phillips@abertay.ac.uk
Publish Date
Received: 10-09-2013
Accepted: 26-11-2013
Published (online): 01-05-2014
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ABSTRACT

The objective of the study was to investigate the influence of serial administration of a carbohydrate (CHO) mouth rinse on performance, metabolic and perceptual responses during a cycle sprint. Twelve physically active males (mean (± SD) age: 23.1 (3.0) years, height: 1.83 (0.07) m, body mass (BM): 86.3 (13.5) kg) completed the following mouth rinse trials in a randomized, counterbalanced, double-blind fashion; 1. 8 x 5 second rinses with a 25 ml CHO (6% w/v maltodextrin) solution, 2. 8 x 5 second rinses with a 25 ml placebo (PLA) solution. Following mouth rinse administration, participants completed a 30 second sprint on a cycle ergometer against a 0.075 g·kg-1 BM resistance. Eight participants achieved a greater peak power output (PPO) in the CHO trial, resulting in a significantly greater PPO compared with PLA (13.51 ± 2.19 vs. 13.20 ± 2.14 W·kg-1, p < 0.05). Magnitude inference analysis reported a likely benefit (81% likelihood) of the CHO mouth rinse on PPO. In the CHO trial, mean power output (MPO) showed a trend for being greater in the first 5 seconds of the sprint and lower for the remainder of the sprint compared with the PLA trial (p > 0.05). No significant between-trials difference was reported for fatigue index, perceived exertion, arousal and nausea levels, or blood lactate and glucose concentrations. Serial administration of a CHO mouth rinse may significantly improve PPO during a cycle sprint. This improvement appears confined to the first 5 seconds of the sprint, and may come at a greater relative cost for the remainder of the sprint.

Key words: Anaerobic, exercise performance, exercise physiology, nutrition, physical performance


           Key Points
  • The paper demonstrates that repeated administration of a carbohydrate mouth rinse can significantly improve peak power output during a single 30 second cycle sprint.
  • The ergogenic effect of the carbohydrate mouth rinse may relate to the duration of exposure of the oral cavity to the mouth rinse, and associated greater stimulation of oral carbohydrate receptors.
  • The significant increase in peak power output with the carbohydrate mouth rinse may come at a relative cost for the remainder of the sprint, evidenced by non-significantly lower mean power output and a greater fatigue index in the carbohydrate vs. placebo trial.
  • Serial administration of a carbohydrate mouth rinse may be beneficial for sprint athletes as a method of performance enhancement that minimizes the risk of performance decrement through body mass increase and gastrointestinal disturbances associated with ingesting carbohydrate solutions.
 
 
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