Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
ISSN: 1303 - 2968   
Ios-APP Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
Androit-APP Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
Views
8223
Download
24
 
©Journal of Sports Science and Medicine ( 2015 ) 14 , 394 - 401

Research article
Negative Associations between Perceived Training Load, Volume and Changes in Physical Fitness in Professional Soccer Players
Asier Los Arcos1, , Raul Martínez-Santos2, Javier Yanci2, Jurdan Mendiguchia3, Alberto Méndez-Villanueva4
Author Information
1 University School of Teaching, University of the Basque Country, UPV/EHU, Vitoria-Gasteiz, Spain
2 Faculty of Physical Activity and Sports Science, University of the Basque Country, UPV/EHU, Vitoria-Gasteiz, Spain
3 Department of Physical Therapy, Zentrum Rehab and Performance Center, Pamplona, Spain
4 ASPIRE Academy for Sports Excellence, Doha, Qatar

Asier Los Arcos
✉ University School of Teaching, UPV/EHU, Juan Ibañez de Sto. Domingo 1, 01006, Vitoria-Gasteiz, Álava, Spain
Email: asier.losarcos@gmail.com
Publish Date
Received: 06-01-2015
Accepted: 13-03-2015
Published (online): 01-06-2015
Share this article
 
 
ABSTRACT

The purpose of this study was to examine the usefulness of the rating of perceived exertion training load for monitoring changes in several aerobic fitness and neuromuscular performance variables during 9 weeks of soccer training in young professional players. Nineteen male soccer players (20.2 ± 1.9 years) belonging to the same reserve team of a Spanish La Liga Club participated in this study. Countermovement jump (CMJ), CMJ arm swing, single leg CMJ, a sprint running test (i.e., 5 m and 15 m times) and an aerobic fitness running test were performed at the start of the pre-season (Test 1) and 9 weeks later (Test 2). During 9 weeks, after each training session and match, players reported their rating of perceived exertion (RPE) separately for respiratory (RPEres) and leg musculature (RPEmus) effort. The training load (TL) was calculated by multiplying the RPE value by the duration in minutes of each training session or match. Accumulated RPEmus, and associated TL, as well as accumulated training volume were negatively correlated with the changes in most physical fitness attributes after 9 weeks of training (r = -0.51 to -0.64). Present results suggest that a high perception of leg muscular effort associated with training sessions and matches, as well as an excessive accumulation of training volume (time), can impair the improvement in several physical fitness variables believed to be relevant for on-field soccer performance. Therefore, the independent assessment of leg muscular effort to quantify TL can be an interesting additional monitoring measure in soccer training.

Key words: Soccer, training load, RPE, physical fitness


           Key Points
  • The purpose of this study was to examine the usefulness of the perceived exertion-derived TL for monitoring changes in several aerobic fitness and neuromuscular parameters during 9 weeks of soccer training in young professional players.
  • A high perception of leg muscular effort associated with training and matches, as well as an excessive accumulation of training volume (time), can impair several physical fitness factors believed to be relevant for on-field soccer performance.
  • The independent assessment of muscular effort to quantify TL can be an interesting additional monitoring measure in soccer training.
 
 
Home Issues About Authors
Contact Current Editorial board Authors instructions
Email alerts In Press Mission For Reviewers
Archive Scope
Supplements Statistics
Most Read Articles
  Most Cited Articles
 
    
 
JSSM | Copyright 2001-2019 | All rights reserved. | LEGAL NOTICES | Publisher

It is forbidden the total or partial reproduction of this web site and the published materials, the treatment of its database, any kind of transition and for any means, either electronic, mechanic or other methods, without the previous written permission of the JSSM.

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.