Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
ISSN: 1303 - 2968   
Ios-APP Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
Androit-APP Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
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©Journal of Sports Science and Medicine ( 2018 ) 17 , 269 - 278

Research article
The Effect of Half-time Re-Warm up Duration on Intermittent Sprint Performance
Takuma Yanaoka1,2, Kyoko Kashiwabara1,2, Yuta Masuda1, Jumpei Yamagami3, Kuran Kurata3, Shun Takagi4, Masashi Miyashita5, Norikazu Hirose5, 
Author Information
1 Graduate School of Sport Sciences, Waseda University, Saitama, Japan
2 Research Fellow of Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, Tokyo, Japan
3 Graduate School of Education, Tokyo Gakugei University, Tokyo, Japan
4 Faculty of Health and Sports Science, Doshisha University, Kyoto, Japan
5 Faculty of Sport Sciences, Waseda University, Saitama, Japan

Norikazu Hirose
✉ Waseda University, Faculty of Sport Sciences, 3-4-1 Higashihushimi, Nishitokyo, Tokyo, 202-0021, Japan
Email: toitsu_hirose@waseda.jp
Publish Date
Received: 22-01-2018
Accepted: 10-04-2018
Published (online): 14-05-2018
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ABSTRACT

The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of different durations of half-time re-warm up (RW) on intermittent sprint performance. Using a randomized crossover design, 13 healthy men performed three trials, which consisted of two, 40-min intermittent exercises separated by a 15-min half-time. Half-time interventions were 15 min of seated rest (Control), 7 min of cycling at 70% of maximal heart rate (HRmax) (7 min RW), and 3 min of cycling at 70% of HRmax (3 min RW). The second 40-min intermittent exercise as an exercise performance test was the Cycling Intermittent-Sprint Protocol (CISP), which consisted of 10 s of rest, 5 s of maximal sprint, and 105 s of low-intensity exercise at 50% of VO2max, with the cycles repeated over the 40-min duration. The mean work during the maximal sprint in the initial 10 min of the CISP was higher in the both RW trials than in the control trial (control: 3638 ± 906 J, 7 min RW: 3808 ± 949 J, p < 0.05, 3 min RW: 3827 ± 960 J, p < 0.05). There were no significant differences among three trials for mean work at 10-20, 20-30, and 30-40 min of the CISP. In the initial 10 min of the CISP, the change in oxygenated hemoglobin concentration during the 105 s of exercise at 50% of VO2max, oxygen uptake, carbon dioxide production, and respiratory exchange ratio were higher in both RW trials than in the control trial (p < 0.05). The rating of perceived exertion after half-time interventions was higher in both RW trials than in the control trial (p < 0.05). In conclusion, the 3 min RW increased intermittent sprint performance after the half-time, compared with a traditional passive half-time practice, and was as effective in improving intermittent sprint performance as the 7 min RW.

Key words: Intermittent team sport, half-time conditioning strategy, warm up duration, exercise performance


           Key Points
  • The present study compared the effect of RWs for 3 and 7 min on intermittent sprint performance.
  • Both RWs for 3 and 7 min were equally effective in improving intermittent sprint performance over the 10-min following half-time, compared with a traditional passive half-time practice.
  • The present study challenges the half-time practice, indicating that a RW for 3 min is beneficial in improving exercise performance after half-time.
 
 
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