Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
ISSN: 1303 - 2968   
Ios-APP Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
Androit-APP Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
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©Journal of Sports Science and Medicine ( 2018 ) 17 , 359 - 365

Research article
Is Plantar Loading Altered During Repeated Sprints on Artificial Turf in International Football Players?
Olivier Girard1,2, Grégoire P. Millet3, , Athol Thomson1,4, Franck Brocherie5
Author Information
1 School of Psychology and Exercise Science, Murdoch University, Perth, Australia
2 Aspetar Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Hospital, Athlete Health and Performance Research Centre, Doha, Qatar
3 ISSUL, Institute of Sport Sciences, Faculty of Biology and Medicine, University of Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland
4 Ulster Sports Academy, University of Ulster, Belfast, UK
5 Laboratory Sport, Expertise and Performance (EA 7370), Research Department, French Institute of Sport (INSEP), Paris, France

Grégoire P. Millet
✉ ISSUL, Institute of Sport Sciences, Faculty of Biology and Medicine, University of Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland
Email: gregoire.millet@unil.ch
Publish Date
Received: 09-04-2018
Accepted: 14-05-2018
Published (online): 14-08-2018
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ABSTRACT

We compared fatigue-induced changes in plantar loading during the repeated anaerobic sprint test over two distinct distance intervals. Twelve international male football outfield players (Qatar Football Association) completed 6 × 35-m sprints (10 s of active recovery) on artificial turf with their football boots. Insole plantar pressure distribution was continuously recorded and values (whole foot and under 9 foot zones) subsequently averaged and compared over two distinct distance intervals (0–17.5 m vs. 17.5–35 m). Sprint times increased (p <0.001) from the first (4.87 ± 0.13 s) to the last (5.63 ± 0.31 s) repetition, independently of the distance interval. Contact area (150 ± 23 vs. 158 ± 19 cm2; -5.8 ± 9.1%; p = 0.032), maximum force (1910 ± 559 vs. 2211 ± 613 N; -16.9 ± 18.2%; p = 0.005) and mean pressure (154 ± 41 vs. 172 ± 37 kPa; -13.9 ± 19.0%; p = 0.033) for the whole foot were lower at 0–17.5 m vs. 17.5–35 m, irrespectively of sprint number. There were no main effects of sprint number or any significant interactions for any plantar variables of the whole foot. The distance interval × sprint number × foot region interaction on relative loads was not significant. Neither distance interval nor fatigue modified plantar pressure distribution patterns. Fatigue led to a decrement in sprint time but no significant change in plantar pressure distribution patterns across sprint repetitions.

Key words: Repeated-sprint ability, plantar loading, pressure distribution patterns, team sports, distance interval


           Key Points
  • Fatigue inducing protocol completion by male international football players on artificial turf led to substantial lengthening in sprint times across repetitions.
  • Differences in plantar loading (whole foot) occurred between the acceleration and terminal phases of each 35-m sprint, but were independent from sprint repetitions.
  • There was no significant change in plantar pressure distribution patterns across sprint repetitions.
 
 
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