Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
ISSN: 1303 - 2968   
Ios-APP Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
Androit-APP Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
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©Journal of Sports Science and Medicine ( 2019 ) 18 , 181 - 190

Research article
Physiological and Psychological Responses during Low-Volume High-Intensity Interval Training Sessions with Different Work-Recovery Durations
Luiz Fernando Farias-Junior1,2, Geovani Araújo Dantas Macêdo2, Rodrigo Alberto Vieira Browne1,2, Yuri Alberto Freire2, Filipe Fernandes Oliveira-Dantas1,2, Daniel Schwade2, Arnaldo Luis Mortatti2, Tony Meireles Santos3, Eduardo Caldas Costa1,2, 
Author Information
1 Graduate Program in Health Sciences, Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte, Natal, RN, Brazil
2 Department of Physical Education, Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte, Natal, RN, Brazil
3 Graduate Program in Physical Education, Federal University of Pernambuco, Recife, PE, Brazil

Eduardo Caldas Costa
✉ Department of Physical Education, Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte, University Campus, Postal Code 59078-970, Brazil
Email: ecc@ufrnet.br
Publish Date
Received: 23-10-2018
Accepted: 11-01-2019
Published (online): 11-02-2019
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ABSTRACT

We compared physiological and psychological responses between low-volume high-intensity interval training (LV-HIIT) sessions with different work-recovery durations. Ten adult males performed two LV-HIIT sessions in a randomized, counter-balanced order. Specifically, 60/60 s LV-HIIT and 30/30 s LV-HIIT. Oxygen uptake (VO2), carbon dioxide output (VCO2), ventilation (VE), respiratory exchange ratio (RER), perceived exertion (RPE), and affect were assessed. During intervals, the VO2 (3.25 ± 0.57 vs. 2.83 ± 0.50 L/min), VCO2 (3.15 ± 0.61 vs. 2.93 ± 0.58 L/min), VE (108.59 ± 27.39 vs. 94.28 ± 24.98 L/min), and RPE (15.9 ± 1.5 vs. 13.9 ± 1.5) were higher (ps ≤ 0.01), while RER (0.98 ± 0.05 vs. 1.03 ± 0.03) and affect (-0.8 ± 1.4 vs. 1.1 ± 2.0) were lower (ps ≤ 0.007) in the 60/60 s LV-HIIT. During recovery periods, VO2 (1.85 ± 0.27 vs. 2.38 ± 0.46 L/min), VCO2 (2.15 ± 0.35 vs. 2.44 ± 0.45 L/min), and affect (0.6 ± 1.7 vs. 1.7 ± 1.8) were lower (ps ≤ 0.02), while RER (1.20 ± 0.05 vs. 1.03 ± 0.05; p < 0.001) was higher in the 60/60 s LV-HIIT. Shorter LV-HIIT (30 s) elicits lower physiological response and attenuated negative affect than longer LV-HIIT (60 s).

Key words: Exercise, interval training, affective response, pleasure, physiological response


           Key Points
  • LV-HIIT protocol with shorter work-recovery duration elicited lower rise in the physiological responses.
  • Intervals at a fixed intensity of 100% Vmax interspaced passive recovery produces a mean intensity of ~70% of VO2peak, but LV-HIIT with longer duration elicited greater amplitude (i.e. work-recovery differences) in the physiological responses (VO2, VCO2, VE, RER, and RPE).
  • LV-HIIT protocol with shorter work-recovery duration elicited an attenuated negative affective response compared to longer.
 
 
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