Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
ISSN: 1303 - 2968   
Ios-APP Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
Androit-APP Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
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©Journal of Sports Science and Medicine ( 2019 ) 18 , 663 - 668

Research article
Correlational Analysis between Joint-level Kinetics of Countermovement Jumps and Weightlifting Derivatives
Kristof Kipp1, , Timothy J. Suchomel2,3, Paul Comfort3
Author Information
1 Department of Physical Therapy – Program in Exercise Science, Marquette University, Milwaukee, USA
2 Department of Human Movement Sciences, Carroll University, Waukesha, USA
3 School of Health Sciences, Salford University, Salford, UK

Kristof Kipp
✉ Department of Physical Therapy – Program in Exercise Science, Marquette University, WI 53233, USA
Email: Kristof.kipp@marquette.edu
Publish Date
Received: 13-05-2019
Accepted: 10-09-2019
Published (online): 01-12-2019
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ABSTRACT

The purpose of this study was to investigate the mechanical similarity between net joint moments (NJM) of the countermovement jump (CMJ) and the hang power clean (HPC) and jump shrug (JS). Twelve male Lacrosse players performed three maximal effort CMJs and three repetitions of the HPC and JS at 30%, 50%, and 70% of their HPC one repetition maximum (1-RM). Ground reaction forces and motion capture data were used to calculate the NJM of the hip, knee, and ankle joints during each exercise. Statistical comparison of the peak NJM indicated that NJM during the HPC and JS across all loads were equal to or greater than the NJM during the CMJ (all p < 0.025). In addition, correlation analyses indicated that CMJ hip NJM were associated (all p < 0.025) with HPC hip NJM at 30% and 70% (r = 0.611–0.822) and JS hip NJM at 50% and 70% (r = 0.674–0.739), whereas CMJ knee NJM were associated with HPC knee NJM at 70% (r = 0.638) and JS knee NJM at 50% and 70% (r = 0.664–0.732). Further, CMJ ankle NJM were associated with HPC ankle NJM at 30% and 50% (r = 0.615–0.697) and JS ankle NJM at 30%, 50%, and 70% (r = 0.735–0.824). Lastly, knee and ankle NJM during the JS were greater than during the HPC at 30% and 50% of 1-RM (all p < 0.017). The degree of mechanical similarity between the CMJ and the HPC and JS is dependent on the respective load and joint.

Key words: Biomechanics, net joint moments, power training, specificity, vertical jumping


           Key Points
  • JS loads greater than 50% exceed the peak NJM demands of the CMJ, and correlate with all NJM during the CMJ.
  • While HPC loads greater than 50% exceeded the peak NJM demands of the CMJ, at 50% only ankle HPC NJM correlated with ankle CMJ NJM and at 70% only hip and knee HPC NJM correlated with the respective NJM during the CMJ.
  • The greatest training stimulus and degree of mechanical similarity between weightlifting derivatives and the CMJ is likely achieved when performing the JS at 50% and 70% and the HPC at 70%.
 
 
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