Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
ISSN: 1303 - 2968   
Ios-APP Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
Androit-APP Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
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©Journal of Sports Science and Medicine ( 2019 ) 18 , 716 - 721

Research article
The Effect of 1600 μg Inhaled Salbutamol Administration on 30 m Sprint Performance Pre and Post a Yo-Yo Intermittent Running Test in Football Players
Michele Merlini1, , Marco Beato2, Samuele Marcora1, John Dickinson1
Author Information
1 School of Sport and Exercise Sciences, University of Kent, Chatham Maritime, UK
2 School of Science, Technology and Engineering, University of Suffolk, Ipswich, UK

Michele Merlini
✉ School of Sport & Exercise Sciences, University of Kent, Chatham Maritime, Kent, ME4 4AG, United Kingdom
Email: michele.merlini1986@gmail.com
Publish Date
Received: 12-04-2019
Accepted: 11-09-2019
Published (online): 01-12-2019
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ABSTRACT

The purpose of the study was to investigate the effect of inhaling 1600 μg of salbutamol (SAL) on 30 m sprint before and after the Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery test. In a randomised cross over single blind study 13 male non-asthmatic, football players volunteered (mean ± SD; age 18.1 ± 0.9 years; weight 69.5 ± 8.3 kg; height 1.78 ± 0.07 m). Participants completed two visits and were randomly assigned to either (SAL) or (PLA) treatment and performed a set of three sprints of 30 m before and after the Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery Test (Yo-Yo IRT). Best sprint and mean sprint were analysed in addition to the distance covered during the Yo-Yo IRT; rating of perceived exertion and heart rate were collected at the end of each level completed. Repeated measures ANOVA were performed to investigate changes in performance between groups. Following the inhalation of supra-therapeutic salbutamol dose (1600 μg) neither 30 m sprint time (PLA 4.43 ± 0.14 s; SAL 4.44 ± 0.15 s, p = 0.76) nor distance covered in the Yo-Yo IRT test reported significant variation between PLA conditions (1660 ± 217 m) and SAL (1610 ± 229 m, p = 0.16). Moreover, lactate values, heart rate and RPE did not differ significantly between groups. The inhalation of 1600 μg salbutamol does not enhance 30 m sprint performance in non-fatigued and fatigue conditions. Our findings suggest when football players acutely inhale double the permitted dose of salbutamol, as indicated in the World Anti-Doping Agency List of Prohibited Substances and Methods, they will not experience improvements in sprint or endurance performance.

Key words: Football, salbutamol, sprint, asthma, doping


           Key Points
  • Investigate the potential ergogenic action of inhaled 1600 μg salbutamol on 30 m sprint performance.
  • Investigate the potential ergogenic action of inhaled 1600 μg salbutamol on 30 m sprint performance after fatigue protocol.
  • Investigate the potential ergogenic action of inhaled 1600 μg salbutamol before and after a Yo-Yo intermittent recovery test.
  • Investigate the effects of inhaled short-acting beta-2 agonist administration on both aerobic and anaerobic exercise replicating intermittent sports performance.
 
 
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