Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
ISSN: 1303 - 2968   
Ios-APP Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
Androit-APP Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
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©Journal of Sports Science and Medicine (2020) 19, 84 - 94

Research article
A Technical Report on the Development of a Real-Time Visual Biofeedback System to Optimize Motor Learning and Movement Deficit Correction
Scott Bonnette1, , Christopher A. DiCesare1, Adam W. Kiefer1,2,3, Michael A. Riley2, Kim D. Barber Foss1, Staci Thomas1, Jed A. Diekfuss1, Gregory D. Myer1,4,5
Author Information
1 The SPORT Center, Division of Sports Medicine, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH Cincinnati Children's Hospital and Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH
2 Center for Cognition, Action, & Perception, Department of Psychology, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH
3 Department of Exercise and Sport Science, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
4 Departments of Pediatrics and Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH, US
5 The Micheli Center for Sports Injury Prevention, Waltham, MA, USA

Scott Bonnette
✉ The SPORT Center, Division of Sports Medicine, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH Cincinnati Children's Hospital and Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH, USA
Email: scott.bonnette@cchmc.org
Publish Date
Received: 10-05-2019
Accepted: 08-11-2019
Published (online): 24-02-2020
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ABSTRACT

This technical report describes the design and implementation of a novel biofeedback system to reduce biomechanical risk factors associated with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries. The system provided objective real-time biofeedback driven by biomechanical variables associated with increased ACL injury risk without the need of a present expert. Eleven adolescent female athletes (age = 16.7 ± 1.34 yrs; height = 1.70 ± 0.05 m; weight = 62.20 ± 5.63 kg) from the same varsity high school volleyball team were enrolled in the experiment. Participants first completed 10 bodyweight squats in the absence of the biofeedback (pretest), 40 bodyweight squats while interacting with the biofeedback, and a final 10 bodyweight squats in the absence of the biofeedback (posttest). Participants also completed three pretest drop vertical jumps and three posttest drop vertical jumps. Results revealed significant improvements in squat performance, as quantified by a novel heat map analysis, from the pretest to the posttest. Additionally, participants displayed improvements in landing mechanics during the drop vertical jump. This study demonstrates that participants were able to interact effectively with the real-time biofeedback and that biomechanical improvements observed during squatting translated to a separate task.

Key words: ACL injury, injury prevention, neuromuscular training


           Key Points
  • Our study demonstrated the technical feasibility for integrating real-time kinematic and kinetic data into a single, interactive visual display.
  • Novel heat map analyses demonstrated that participants improved biomechanics associated with ACL injury risk over a single training session.
  • Training with our real-time biofeedback system transferred to improved ACL injury-risk biomechanics during a drop landing.
  • The tested real-time biofeedback system could eventually be used as an alternative and/or supplemental approach to ACL injury prevention programs.
 
 
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