Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
ISSN: 1303 - 2968   
Ios-APP Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
Androit-APP Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
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©Journal of Sports Science and Medicine (2003) 02, 158 - 162

Research article
Effect of 30°C Heat on the Anaerobic Capacity of Heat Acclimatised Athletes
James P. Finn1,2, , Rob J. Wood1, John F. Marsden1
Author Information
1 National Heat Training and Acclimatisation Centre, Northern Territory Institute of Sport, Marrara, Australia
2 School of Health Sciences, Northern Territory University, Darwin, Australia

James P. Finn
✉ School of Health Sciences, Northern Territory University, Darwin, NT 0909, Australia
Email: paul.finn@ntu.edu.au
Publish Date
Received: 28-08-2003
Accepted: 31-10-2003
Published (online): 01-12-2003
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ABSTRACT

The main finding of this study was that for heat acclimatised athletes, there was no significant difference (p=0.58) in anaerobic capacity for temperate (21.8 ± 0.5 °C; 52 ± 5 % relative humidity) compared with warm conditions (29.6 ± 0.5 °C; 51 ± 9 % relative humidity). Anaerobic capacity was estimated using the maximal accumulated oxygen deficit (MAOD) during constant intensity cycling at 120% peak rate of O2 consumption until exhaustion. This yielded mean MAOD values of 3.3 ± 0.9 and 3.5 ± 1.1 L for temperate and warm conditions, respectively. Peak post-exercise lactate values of 14.7 ± 3.8 and 14.4 ± 4.5 mmol·L-1 for temperate and warm conditions respectively, were also not significantly different (p=0.72). Time to exhaustion (TTE) was similarly unchanged (p=0.56), being 175 ± 19 and 170 ± 18 s for temperate and warm conditions, respectively. These results suggest that the MAOD remains a valid test throughout environmental temperatures for the range of 20-30 °C when used with heat acclimatised athletes.

Key words: Maximal accumulated oxygen deficit, anaerobic metabolism, environmental temperature, maximal exercise


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