Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
ISSN: 1303 - 2968   
Ios-APP Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
Androit-APP Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
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©Journal of Sports Science and Medicine (2005) 04, 253 - 262

Research article
Nutrient Intakes of Men and Women Collegiate Athletes with Disordered Eating
Pamela S. Hinton , Niels C. Beck
Author Information
University of Missouri-Columbia, USA

Pamela S. Hinton
✉ Ass. Professor of Nutritional Sciences, University of Missouri, 106 McKee Gym, Columbia, MO 65211, USA.
Email: hintonp@missouri.edu
Publish Date
Received: 16-02-2005
Accepted: 01-06-2005
Published (online): 01-09-2005
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ABSTRACT

The objective of this study was to assess the macro- and micronutrient intakes of men and women collegiate athletes with disordered eating behaviors and to compare the nutrient intakes of athletes with restrictive- versus binge-eating behaviors. National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I University athletes (n = 232) were administered an anonymous, written questionnaire to compare nutrient intakes, desired weight change, and weight control behaviors in athletes with restrictive- (R) and binge- (B) eating behaviors to those in asymptomatic (A) athletes. T-tests, χ2 statistic, and ANOVA were used to test for differences among disordered eating groups within genders (p < 0.05). Data are means ± standard error of the mean. Among men athletes, those with disordered eating consumed a smaller percentage of energy from carbohydrate compared to controls (R = 49.7 ± 1.5; B = 48.7 ± 2.3; A = 53.4 ± 0.7%). Among female athletes, those with disordered eating wanted to lose a greater percentage of their current body weight than did asymptomatic athletes (B = -6.1 ± 1.4; R = -6.7 ± 1.1; A = -3.7 ± 0.4%). Women who were classified with binge eating consumed significantly more alcohol than did controls (B = 6.8 ± 1.3; A = 3.9 ± 0.4 g alcohol per day). Athletes with disordered eating were more likely to report restricting their intake of carbohydrate and fat and using supplements to control their weight than asymptomatic athletes. Disordered eating was not associated with greater frequencies of inadequate micronutrient intake in either gender. Athletes with disordered eating may be at significantly greater risk for nutritional inadequacies than athletes who are asymptomatic due to macronutrient restriction and greater alcohol consumption.

Key words: Eating disorder, Female Athlete Triad


           Key Points
  • Athletes with disordered eating were more likely to report restricting their intake of carbohydrate and fat and using supplements to control their weight than asymptomatic athletes
  • Among female athletes, those with disordered eating wanted to lose a greater percentage of their current body weight than did asymptomatic athletes
  • Disordered eating was not associated with greater frequencies of inadequate micronutrient intake in either gender
  • Athletes with disordered eating may be at significantly greater risk for nutritional inadequacies than athletes who are asymptomatic due to macronutrient restriction and greater alcohol consumption.
 
 
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