Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
ISSN: 1303 - 2968   
Ios-APP Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
Androit-APP Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
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©Journal of Sports Science and Medicine (2005) 04, 52 - 57

Research article
Mood Disturbance During Cycling Performance at Extreme Conditions
Andrew M. Lane1, , Gregory P. Whyte2, Rob Shave3, Sam Barney1, Matthew Stevens1, Matthew Wilson4
Author Information
1 University of Wolverhampton, UK
2 English Institute for Sport, UK
3 Brunel University, UK
4 Centre for Sports Cardiology, Olympic Medical Institute, Harrow, London

Andrew M. Lane
✉ University of Wolverhampton, Gorway Road, Walsall, WSI 3BD, UK
Email: A.M.Lane2@wlv.ac.uk
Publish Date
Received: 10-10-2004
Accepted: 26-12-2004
Published (online): 01-03-2005
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ABSTRACT

The purpose of the study was to investigate the effects of extreme environments on mood state changes in hypoxic conditions and cold conditions in comparison to baseline conditions. The research design involved participants completing a two-hour stationary cycle ergometer ride at a simulated altitude of 2,500 metres, O°C, and normal laboratory conditions at a pace equivalent of lactate threshold. Eight male elite cyclists (Age: M = 26.23 yrs., SD = 6.74) completed the hypoxia- normal cycling trials. Ten male highly trained cyclists (Age: M = 23.34 yrs., SD = 5.45) participated in the cold-normal trials. Mood was assessed before, after one hour, and after two hours using the 24-item Brunel Mood Scale. MANOVA results indicated no significant interaction effect for mood changes over time by environment condition (Wilks’ Lambda = .73, p = .32, Eta2 = .05), a significant main effect for mood changes over time (Wilks’ Lambda = .61. p < .001, Partial Eta2 = .15) and a significant main effect for differences in mood by condition (Wilks’ Lambda = .72, p < .000, Partial Eta2 = .15). Results indicated that increased anger, depression and fatigue were associated with performing at altitude, particularly after two hours of exercise. Collectively, results lend support to the notion that altitude is associated with negative mood states, although it should be noted that environment conditions did not affect the change in mood states over time. We suggest that further research is needed to explore mechanisms that individuals use to regulate negative mood during strenuous exercise.

Key words: Mood, coping, environment, altitude, cold, performance


           Key Points
  • The present study found that mood state changes were more pronounced when performing at a simulated altitude of 2,500 metres than performing in the cold and normal laboratory conditions at a pace equivalent of lactate threshold.
  • Findings from the present study indicate that that altitude is associated with negative mood states,
  • Results show that mood states change during extreme exercise with increases most notably in fatigue and reductions in vigor. It should be noted that environment conditions did not affect the change in mood states over time.
  • We suggest that further research is needed to explore mechanisms that individuals use to regulate negative mood during strenuous exercise.
 
 
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