Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
ISSN: 1303 - 2968   
Ios-APP Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
Androit-APP Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
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©Journal of Sports Science and Medicine (2006) 05, 359 - 366

Research article, Young investigator
Jump Kinetic Determinants of Sprint Acceleration Performance from Starting Blocks in Male Sprinters
Peter S. Maulder1, , Elizabeth J. Bradshaw2, Justin Keogh1
Author Information
1 Division of Sport and Recreation, Institute of Sport and Recreation Research New Zealand, Auckland University of Technology, Auckland, New Zealand
2 School of Exercise Science, Australian Catholic University, Melbourne, Australia

Peter S. Maulder
✉ Institute of Sport and Recreation Research New Zealand, Auckland University of Technology, Private Bag 92006, Auckland 1020, New Zealand.
Email: peter.maulder@aut.ac.nz
Publish Date
Received: 24-10-2005
Accepted: 22-05-2006
Published (online): 01-06-2006
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ABSTRACT

The purpose of this research was to identify the jump kinetic determinants of sprint acceleration performance from a block start. Ten male (mean ± SD: age 20 ± 3 years; height 1.82 ± 0.06 m; weight 76.7 ± 7.9 kg; 100 m personal best: 10.87 + 0.36 s {10.37 - 11.42}) track sprinters at a national and regional competitive level performed 10 m sprints from a block start. Anthropometric dimensions along with squat jump (SJ), countermovement jump (CMJ), continuous straight legged jump (SLJ), single leg hop for distance, and single leg triple hop for distance measures of power were also tested. Stepwise multiple regression analysis identified CMJ average power (W/kg) as a predictor of 10 m sprint performance from a block start (r = 0.79, r2 = 0.63, p<0.01, SEE = 0.04 (s), %SEE = 2.0). Pearson correlation analysis revealed CMJ force and power (r = -0.70 to -0.79; p = 0.011 - 0.035) and SJ power (r = -0.72 to -0.73; p = 0.026 - 0.028) generating capabilities to be strongly related to sprint performance. Further linear regression analysis predicted an increase in CMJ average and peak take-off power of 1 W/kg (3% & 1.5% respectively) to both result in a decrease of 0.01 s (0.5%) in 10 m sprint performance. Further, an increase in SJ average and peak take-off power of 1 W/kg (3.5% & 1.5% respectively) was predicted to result in a 0.01 s (0.5%) reduction in 10 m sprint time. The results of this study seem to suggest that the ability to generate power both elastically during a CMJ and concentrically during a SJ to be good indicators of predicting sprint performance over 10 m from a block start.

Key words: Anthropometry, horizontal jumps, sprint performance, vertical jumps


           Key Points
  • The relative explosive ability of the hip and knee extensors during a countermovement jump can predict 10 m sprint performance from a block start.
  • The relative power outputs of male competitive sprinters during a squat jump can predict 10 m sprint performance from a block start.
 
 
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