Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
ISSN: 1303 - 2968   
Ios-APP Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
Androit-APP Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
Views
6813
Download
178
from September 2014
 
©Journal of Sports Science and Medicine (2007) 06, 188 - 192

Research article
Is Blood Lactate Removal During Water Immersed Cycling Faster than During Cycling on Land?
Fabrízio Di Masi1, Rodrigo Gomes De Souza Vale3, Estélio Henrique Martin Dantas1, Ana Cristina Lopes Barreto2, Jefferson da Silva Novaes1,2, Victor M. Reis4, 
Author Information
1 University Castelo Branco, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
2 Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
3 LABIMH/RN, Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil
4 University of Trás-os-Montes and Alto Douro, Vila Real, Portugal

Victor M. Reis
✉ University of Trás-os-Montes and Alto Douro – Department of Sport Sciences, Apartado 1013, 5000-911 Vila Real, Portugal
Email: vreis@utad.pt
Publish Date
Received: 10-11-2006
Accepted: 13-02-2007
Published (online): 01-06-2007
Share this article
 
 
ABSTRACT

The aim of the present study was to compare lactate removal during active recovery performed during cycling in water immersion (CW) and during cycling on land (CL), after a similar exercise bout in male adults. Eleven healthy and physically active men, aged between 20 and 26 years old participated in the experiment. Before the experimental tests, the ventilatory threshold of the subjects was determined. Each subject completed the experimental tests twice, with one week separating the two periods of experiment. The subjects exercised on the treadmill during 6 min at a speed 10% above the speed corresponding to their ventilatory threshold. Subsequently, the subjects recovered from the exercise bout either on a stationary bike (CL) or on a aquatic-specific bike (CW). On the subsequent week the subjects performed the same protocol but with a different recovery condition. Recovery condition assignment for the first test was counterbalanced (six subjects started with one condition and five with the other). Capillary blood samples were collected after each test and during the recovery period (at 3, 6, 9 and 15 minutes) and blood lactate was measured. The blood lactate values during CW were lower than during CL and significant differences were observed at the 6th minute (p ≤ 0.05) and at the 15th minute of recovery (p ≤ 0.05). Therefore, we may conclude that active recovery using cycling in water immersion may be more efficient than cycling on land for blood lactate removal.

Key words: Active recovery, water exercise, land exercise


           Key Points
  • Previous studies have found positive effects of half liquid environment on blood lactate removal.
  • However, few studies have compared lactate removal in half liquid and in dry land conditions with the use of stationary bikes.
  • We have compared the lactate removal during active recovery on half-liquid cycling and active recovery on dry land cycling after a similar exercise bout in male adults.
  • The blood lactate values during the recovery were lower after half-liquid cycling when compared with dry land cycling and significant differences were observed at the 6 minute and at the 15 minute of recovery.
  • We may conclude that active recovery using half-liquid cycling may be more efficient than dry land cycling for blood lactate removal.
 
 
Home Issues About Authors
Contact Current Editorial board Authors instructions
Email alerts In Press Mission For Reviewers
Archive Scope
Supplements Statistics
Most Read Articles
  Most Cited Articles
 
  
 
JSSM | Copyright 2001-2020 | All rights reserved. | LEGAL NOTICES | Publisher

It is forbidden the total or partial reproduction of this web site and the published materials, the treatment of its database, any kind of transition and for any means, either electronic, mechanic or other methods, without the previous written permission of the JSSM.

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.