Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
ISSN: 1303 - 2968   
Ios-APP Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
Androit-APP Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
Views
6097
Download
170
from September 2014
 
©Journal of Sports Science and Medicine (2007) 06, 98 - 105

Research article
Absence of Gender Differences in the Fatigability of the Forearm Muscles During Intermittent Isometric Handgrip Exercise
Joaquin U. Gonzales, Barry W. Scheuermann 
Author Information
Cardiopulmonary and Metabolism Research Laboratory, Department of Kinesiology, The University of Toledo, Toledo, Ohio USA,

Barry W. Scheuermann
✉ Assistant Professor, Department of Kinesiology, College of Health and Human Services, The University of Toledo, Toledo, Ohio 43607, USA.
Email: barry.scheuermann@utoledo.edu
Publish Date
Received: 29-08-2006
Accepted: 19-01-2007
Published (online): 01-03-2007
Share this article
 
 
ABSTRACT

Previous studies have reported women to have a greater resistance to fatigue than men during sustained handgrip exercise, however, observed gender differences in fatigue has been shown to be a function of contraction type. The purpose of the present study was to determine if gender differences exist in forearm muscle fatigue during intermittent handgrip contractions. Women [n = 11, 23.5 ± 1.5 (SE) yr] and men (n = 11, 24.1 ± 1.5 yr) performed intermittent isometric handgrip contractions at a target force of 50% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) for 5 s followed by 5 s rest until task failure. Rate of fatigue was calculated from MVCs taken every 2 min during exercise, and recovery of muscle strength was measured in 5 min increments until 45 min post-task failure. Forearm muscle strength was less for women than men (W: 341.5 ± 11.9 N; M: 480.2 ± 28.0 N; p ≤ 0.05). No gender difference was present in time to task failure (W: 793.3 ± 92.5 s; M: 684.8 ± 76.3 s) or in the decrease in muscle force generating capacity at task failure (W: -47.6 ± 1.0%; M: -49.9 ± 1.3%). Rate of muscle fatigue was found to be similar between women and men (W: -3.6 ± 0.5 %·min-1; M: -4.3 ± 0.6 %·min-1) and no gender difference was found in the recovery of muscle strength following task failure. In summary, no gender difference was found in the fatigability of the forearm muscles during intermittent submaximal handgrip contractions, independent of muscle strength.

Key words: Muscle fatigue, gender differences, handgrip


           Key Points
  • The aim of the present study was to determine if gender differences exist in forearm muscle fatigue during intermittent isometric handgrip contractions.
  • Both unmatched and matched for strength gender comparisons found women and men to exhibit a similar exercise tolerance, rate of fatigue, and recov-ery of handgrip force following repeated forearm muscle contractions.
  • These results indicate that maximal handgrip strength is not a key determinant of exercise toler-ance during intermittent isometric forearm exercise performed at a moderate relative contraction inten-sity.
 
 
Home Issues About Authors
Contact Current Editorial board Authors instructions
Email alerts In Press Mission For Reviewers
Archive Scope
Supplements Statistics
Most Read Articles
  Most Cited Articles
 
  
 
JSSM | Copyright 2001-2020 | All rights reserved. | LEGAL NOTICES | Publisher

It is forbidden the total or partial reproduction of this web site and the published materials, the treatment of its database, any kind of transition and for any means, either electronic, mechanic or other methods, without the previous written permission of the JSSM.

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.