Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
ISSN: 1303 - 2968   
Ios-APP Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
Androit-APP Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
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©Journal of Sports Science and Medicine (2008) 07, 512 - 519

Research article
Pronounced Muscle Deoxygenation During Supramaximal Exercise Under Simulated Hypoxia in Sprint Athletes
Kazuo Oguri,1 , Hajime Fujimoto2, Hiroyuki Sugimori3, Kei Miyamoto4, Toshiki Tachi1, Sachio Nagasaki5, Yoshihiro Kato5, Toshio Matsuoka5
Author Information
1 Faculty of Management, Shizuoka Sangyo University, Japan
2 International Pacific University, Japan
3 Faculty of Education, Gifu University, Japan
4 Department of Reconstructive Surgery, Gifu University School of Medicine, Japan
5 Department of Sports Medicine and Sports Science, Gifu University Graduate School of Medicine, Japan

Kazuo Oguri
✉ Faculty of Management, Shizuoka Sangyo University, 1572-1 Owara, Iwata, Shizuoka, 438-0043, Japan.
Email: oguri@iwata.ssu.ac.jp
Publish Date
Received: 24-06-2008
Accepted: 17-10-2008
Published (online): 01-12-2008
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ABSTRACT

The purpose of this study was to determine whether acute hypoxia alters the deoxygenation level in vastus lateralis muscle during a 30 s Wingate test, and to compare the muscle deoxygenation level between sprint athletes and untrained men. Nine male track sprinters (athletic group, VO2max 62.5 ± 4.1 ml/kg/min) and 9 healthy untrained men (untrained group, VO2max 49.9 ± 5.2 ml·kg-1·min-1) performed a 30 s Wingate test under simulated hypoxic (FIO2 = 0.164 and PIO2 = 114 mmHg) and normoxic conditions. During the exercise, changes in oxygenated hemoglobin (OxyHb) in the vastus lateralis were measured using near infrared continuous wave spectroscopy. Decline in OxyHb, that is muscle deoxygenation, was expressed as percent change from baseline. Percutaneous arterial oxygen saturation (SpO2), oxygen uptake (VO2), and ventilation (VE) were measured continuously. In both groups, there was significantly greater muscle deoxygenation, lower SpO2, lower peakVO2, and higher peakVE during supramaximal exercise under hypoxia than under normoxia, but no differences in peak and mean power output during the exercise. Under hypoxia, the athletic group experienced significantly greater muscle deoxygenation, lower SpO2, greater decrement in peakVO2 and increment in peakVE during the exercise than the untrained group. When the athletic and untrained groups were pooled, the increment of muscle deoxygenation was strongly correlated with lowest SpO2 in the 30 s Wingate test under hypoxia. These results suggest that acute exposure to hypoxia causes a greater degree of peripheral muscle deoxygenation during supramaximal exercise, especially in sprint athletes, and this physiological response would be explained mainly by lower arterial oxygen saturation.

Key words: NIRcws, muscle deoxygenation, hypoxic, 30s Wingate test, athletes


           Key Points
  • The deoxygenation trends in the vastus lateralis muscle during 30 s Wingate test in track sprinters and untrained men under simulated hypoxic and normoxic conditions was investigated using near infrared spectroscopy.
  • Acute hypoxia caused a greater degree of peripheral muscle deoxygenation than normoxia, whereas there were no changes in performance such as power output during 30 s Wingate test.
  • Sprint athletes show a greater degree of peripheral muscle deoxygenation during 30 s Wingate test in hypoxia when compared with untrained subjects.
  • A larger difference in muscle deoxygenation between hypoxia and normoxia is accompanied by lowest SpO2 at the 30 s Wingate test in hypoxia.
 
 
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