Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
ISSN: 1303 - 2968   
Ios-APP Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
Androit-APP Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
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©Journal of Sports Science and Medicine (2009) 08, 130 - 135

Research article
Self-Reported Versus Diagnosed Stress Fractures in Norwegian Female Elite Athletes
Jannike Øyen1, , Monica Klungland Torstveit2, Jorunn Sundgot-Borgen3
Author Information
1 Department of Surgical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway
2 University of Agder, Kristiansand, Norway
3 The Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, Ullevål Stadion, Oslo, Norway

Jannike Øyen
✉ Department of Surgical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Bergen, N-5021 Bergen, Norway.
Email: jannike.oyen@kir.uib.no
Publish Date
Received: 17-12-2008
Accepted: 09-02-2009
Published (online): 01-03-2009
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ABSTRACT

The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of self- reported versus diagnosed stress fractures in female elite athletes and non-athletic controls. A random sample of Norwegian elite athletes from the national teams, aged 13-39 years (n = 186) and a random sample of non-athletic controls (n = 145) in the same age group participated in the study. The athletes represented a junior- or senior team, or a recruiting squad for one of these teams, in one of 46 different sports/events. A higher percentage of athletes self-reported stress fractures (14.0%) compared to those diagnosed with stress fractures (8.1%) (p < 0.001). Six controls self- reported stress fractures, but none of them were diagnosed with stress fractures. These results indicate that self-reporting of stress fractures has low validity. This finding has important implications for further research on stress fractures in athletes.

Key words: Imaging, sports, injuries, validity


           Key Points
  • This study is the first to compare self-reported and diagnosed stress fractures in the total population of elite athletes representing all kinds of sports.
  • The results indicate that self-reporting of stress fractures has low validity in both athletes and non-athletic controls, and other measurement methods should be considered when evaluating possible stress fractures.
  • Based on our results, stress fractures seem to be a sport-related injury.
 
 
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