Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
ISSN: 1303 - 2968   
Ios-APP Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
Androit-APP Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
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©Journal of Sports Science and Medicine (2009) 08, 528 - 532

Research article
Familiarisation and Reliability of Sprint Test Indices During Laboratory and Field Assessment
James G. Hopker1, , Damian A. Coleman2, Jonathan D. Wiles2, Andrew Galbraith1
Author Information
1 University of Kent, Chatham Maritime, Chatham, Kent, UK
2 Canterbury Christ Church University, Canterbury, Kent, UK

James G. Hopker
✉ Centre for Sports Studies, University of Kent, Chatham Maritime, Chatham, Kent, ME4 4AG, United Kingdom
Email: j.g.hopker@kent.ac.uk
Publish Date
Received: 27-04-2009
Accepted: 11-08-2009
Published (online): 01-12-2009
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ABSTRACT

The aim of the study was to assess the reliability of sprint performance in both field and laboratory conditions. Twenty-one male (mean ± s: 19 ± 1 years, 1.79 ± 0.07 m, 77.6 ± 7.1 kg) and seventeen female team sport players (mean ± s: 21 ± 4 years, 1.68 ± 0. 07 m, 62.7 ± 4.7 kg) performed a maximal 20-metre sprint running test on eight separate occasions. Four trials were conducted on a non-motorised treadmill in the laboratory; the other four were conducted outdoors on a hard-court training surface with time recorded by single-beam photocells. Trials were conducted in random order with no familiarisation prior to testing. There was a significant difference between times recorded during outdoor field trials (OFT) and indoor laboratory trials (ILT) using a non-motorised treadmill (3.47 ± 0.53 vs. 6.06 ±1.17s; p < 0.001). The coefficient of variation (CV) for time was 2.55-4.22% for OFT and 5.1-7.2% for ILT. During ILT peak force (420.9 ± 87.7N), mean force (147.2 ± 24.7N), peak power (1376.8 ± 451.9W) and mean power (514.8 ± 164.4W), and were measured. The CV for all ILT variables was highest during trial 1-2 comparison. The CV (95% confidence interval) for the trial 3-4 comparison yielded: 9.4% (7.7-12. 1%), 7.9% (6.4-10.2%), 10.1% (8.2-13.1%) and 6.2% (5.1-8.0%) for PF, MF, PP and MP and respectively. The results indicate that reliable data can be derived for single maximal sprint measures, using fixed distance protocols. However, significant differences in time/speed over 20-m exist between field and laboratory conditions. This is primarily due to the frictional resistance in the non- motorised treadmill. Measures of force and power during ILT require at least 3 familiarisations to reduce variability in test scores.

Key words: Non-motorised treadmill, force, power, familiarisation, sprint running


           Key Points
  • Reliable data can be derived from single maximal sprint measures in both indoor and outdoor environments using fixed distance protocols.
  • There may be significant time differences to complete fixed distance trials between the two environments.
  • Measures of mean force, peak force and peak power during indoor trials may require multiple trials to reduce variability in test scores.
 
 
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