Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
ISSN: 1303 - 2968   
Ios-APP Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
Androit-APP Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
Views
6137
Download
160
from September 2014
 
©Journal of Sports Science and Medicine (2009) 08, 607 - 615

Research article
Kinetic Assessment of Golf Shoe Outer Sole Design Features
Paul Worsfold , Neal A. Smith, Rosemary J. Dyson
Author Information
1 University of Chichester, West Sussex, UK

Paul Worsfold
‚úČ University of Chichester, Chichester, West Sussex, UK.
Email: p.worsfold@chester.ac.uk
Publish Date
Received: 14-08-2009
Accepted: 01-10-2009
Published (online): 01-12-2009
Share this article
 
 
ABSTRACT

This study assessed human kinetics in relation to golf shoe outer sole design features during the golf swing using a driver club by measuring both within the shoe, and beneath the shoe at the natural grass interface. Three different shoes were assessed: metal 7- spike shoe, alternative 7-spike shoe, and a flat soled shoe. In-shoe plantar pressure data were recorded using Footscan RS International pressure insoles and sampling at 500 Hz. Simultaneously ground reaction force at the shoe outer sole was measured using 2 natural grass covered Kistler force platforms and 1000 Hz data acquisition. Video recording of the 18 right-handed golfers at 200 Hz was undertaken while the golfer performed 5 golf shots with his own driver in each type of shoe. Front foot (nearest to shot direction) maximum vertical force and torque were greater than at the back foot, and there was no significant difference related to the shoe type. Wearing the metal spike shoe when using a driver was associated with more torque generation at the back foot (p < 0. 05) than when the flat soled shoe was worn. Within shoe regional pressures differed significantly with golf shoe outer sole design features (p < 0.05). Comparison of the metal spike and alternative spike shoe results provided indications of the quality of regional traction on the outer sole. Potential golf shoe outer sole design features and traction were presented in relation to phases of the golf swing movement. Application of two kinetic measurement methods identified that moderated (adapted) muscular control of foot and body movement may be induced by golf shoe outer sole design features. Ground reaction force measures inform comparisons of overall shoe functional performance, and insole pressure measurements inform comparisons of the underfoot conditions induced by specific regions of the golf shoe outer sole.

Key words: Club, driver, grass, ground- reaction-force, insole-pressure, spikes.


           Key Points
  • Assessments of within golf shoe pressures and beneath shoe forces at the natural grass interface were conducted during golf shots with a driver.
  • Application of two kinetic measurement methods simultaneously identified that moderated (adapted) muscular control of the foot and body movement may be induced by golf shoe outer sole localised design features.
  • Ground force measures inform overall shoe kinetic functional performance.
  • Insole pressure measurement informs of underfoot conditions induced by localised specific regions of the golf outer sole.
  • Significant differences in ground-shoe torque generation and insole regional pressures were identified when different golf shoes were worn.
 
 
Home Issues About Authors
Contact Current Editorial board Authors instructions
Email alerts In Press Mission For Reviewers
Archive Scope
Supplements Statistics
Most Read Articles
  Most Cited Articles
 
  
 
JSSM | Copyright 2001-2020 | All rights reserved. | LEGAL NOTICES | Publisher

It is forbidden the total or partial reproduction of this web site and the published materials, the treatment of its database, any kind of transition and for any means, either electronic, mechanic or other methods, without the previous written permission of the JSSM.

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.