Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
ISSN: 1303 - 2968   
Ios-APP Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
Androit-APP Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
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©Journal of Sports Science and Medicine (2010) 09, 224 - 230

Research article
Metabolic and Cardiovascular Responses to Upright Cycle Exercise with Leg Blood Flow Reduction
Hayao Ozaki1, William F. Brechue2, Mikako Sakamaki1, Tomohiro Yasuda1, Masato Nishikawa3, Norikazu Aoki3, Futoshi Ogita3, Takashi Abe1, 
Author Information
1 Department of Human and Engineered Environmental Studies, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Japan
2 Center for Physical Development Excellence, United States Military Academy, West Point, NY, USA
3 Department of Exercise Physiology, National Institute of Fitness and Sports in Kanoya, Kanoya, Japan

Takashi Abe
‚úČ Department of Human and Engineered Environmental Studies, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba, Japan
Email: abe@k.u-tokyo.ac.jp
Publish Date
Received: 08-01-2010
Accepted: 02-03-2010
Published (online): 01-06-2010
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ABSTRACT

The purpose of this study was to examine the metabolic and cardiovascular response to exercise without (CON) or with (BFR) restricted blood flow to the muscles. Ten young men performed upright cycle exercise at 20, 40, and 60% of maximal oxygen uptake, VO2max in both conditions while metabolic and cardiovascular parameters were determined. Pre-exercise VO2 was not different between CON and BFR. Cardiac output (Q) was similar between the two conditions as a 25% reduction in stroke volume (SV) observed in BFR was associated with a 23% higher heart rate (HR) in BFR compared to CON. As a result rate-pressure product (RPP) was higher in the BFR but there was no difference in mean arterial pressure (MAP) or total peripheral resistance (TPR). During exercise, VO2 tended to increase with BFR (~10%) at each workload. Q increased in proportion to exercise intensity and there were no differences between conditions. The increase in SV with exercise was impaired during BFR; being ~20% lower in BFR at each workload. Both HR and RPP were significantly greater at each workload with BFR. MAP and TPR were greater with BFR at 40 and 60% VO2max. In conclusion, the BFR employed impairs exercise SV but central cardiovascular function is maintained by an increased HR. BFR appears to result in a greater energy demand during continuous exercise between 20 and 60% of control VO2max; probably indicated by a higher energy supply and RPP. When incorporating BFR, HR and RPP may not be valid or reliable indicators of exercise intensity.

Key words: Aerobic exercise, doppler echocardiography, apparent exercise intensity, occlusion


           Key Points
  • Blood flow reduction (BFR) employed impairs stroke volume (SV) during exercise, but central cardiovascular function is maintained by an increased heart rate (HR).
  • BFR appears to result in a greater energy demand during continuous exercise between 20 and 60% of control VOmax;
  • Probably indicated by a higher energy supply (VO) and rate-pressure product (HR x systolic blood pressure).
 
 
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