Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
ISSN: 1303 - 2968   
Ios-APP Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
Androit-APP Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
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©Journal of Sports Science and Medicine (2011) 10, 408 - 416

Research article
Short Durations of Static Stretching when Combined with Dynamic Stretching do not Impair Repeated Sprints and Agility
Del P. Wong1, , Anis Chaouachi2, Patrick W.C. Lau3, David G. Behm4
Author Information
1 Department of Health and Physical Education, The Hong Kong Institute of Education, Hong Kong
2 Tunisian Research Laboratory “Sport Performance Optimisation”, National Center of Medicine and Science in Sports, Tunis, Tunisia
3 Department of Physical Education, Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong
4 School of Human Kinetics and Recreation, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John’s Newfoundland, Canada, A1M 3L8

Del P. Wong
✉ Address: Department of Health and Physical Education, The Hong Kong Institute of Education, Tai Po, Hong Kong.
Email: delwong@alumni.cuhk.net
Publish Date
Received: 25-02-2011
Accepted: 10-05-2011
Published (online): 01-06-2011
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ABSTRACT

This study aimed to compare the effect of different static stretching durations followed by dynamic stretching on repeated sprint ability (RSA) and change of direction (COD). Twenty-five participants performed the RSA and COD tests in a randomized order. After a 5 min aerobic warm up, participants performed one of the three static stretching protocols of 30 s, 60 s or 90 s total duration (3 stretches x 10 s, 20 s or 30 s). Three dynamic stretching exercises of 30 s duration were then performed (90 s total). Sit-and-reach flexibility tests were conducted before the aerobic warm up, after the combined static and dynamic stretching, and post- RSA/COD test. The duration of static stretching had a positive effect on flexibility with 36.3% and 85.6% greater sit-and-reach scores with the 60 s and 90 s static stretching conditions respectively than with the 30 s condition (p ≤ 0.001). However there were no significant differences in RSA and COD performance between the 3 stretching conditions. The lack of change in RSA and COD might be attributed to a counterbalancing of static and dynamic stretching effects. Furthermore, the short duration (≤ 90 s) static stretching may not have provided sufficient stimulus to elicit performance impairments.

Key words: Flexibility, agility, running, stretch duration, stretch intensity


           Key Points
  • The duration of combined static and dynamic stretching had a positive effect on flexibility with 36.3% and 85.6% greater sit and reach scores with the 60 s and 90 s static stretching conditions respectively than with the 30 s condition (p ≤ 0.001).
  • No significant differences in RSA and COD between the 3 stretching conditions.
  • The lack of change in RSA and COD might be attributed to a counterbalancing of static and dynamic stretching effects.
  • The short duration (≤ 90 s) static stretching may not have provided sufficient stimulus to elicit performance impairments.
 
 
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