Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
ISSN: 1303 - 2968   
Ios-APP Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
Androit-APP Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
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©Journal of Sports Science and Medicine (2014) 13, 522 - 528

Research article
Do Parents’ Exercise Habits Predict 13–18-Year-Old Adolescents’ Involvement in Sport?
Saulius Sukys , Daiva Majauskienė, Vida J. Cesnaitiene, Diana Karanauskiene
Author Information
Department of Health, Physical and Social Education, Lithuanian Sports University, Kaunas, Lithuania

Saulius Sukys
✉ Professor, Department of Health, Physical and Social Education, Lithuanian Sports University, Sporto str.6, Kaunas, Lithuania
Email: saulius.sukys@lsu.lt
Publish Date
Received: 18-09-2013
Accepted: 18-03-2014
Published (online): 01-09-2014
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ABSTRACT

This study examined links between parents’ exercise habits and adolescents’ participation in sports activities, considering the aspects of gender and age. It was hypothesized that regular exercise by both parents would be related to children’s involvement in sport regardless of their gender and age. Moreover, it was hypothesized that children’s sports activities would be more strongly related to their father’s exercise activities. The study also examined the links between parents’ exercise habits and children’s motivation for sports. It was hypothesized that competition motives would be more important for children whose parents exercised regularly. The research sample included 2335 students from the seventh (n = 857), ninth (n = 960) and eleventh (n = 518) grades of various Lithuanian schools. The study used a questionnaire survey method, which revealed the links between parents’ exercise habits and their children’s participation in sport. Assessment of data for girls and boys showed that daughters’ participation in sport could be predicted by both their fathers’ and mothers’ exercise habits, but sons’ sports activities could be predicted only by the regular physical activities of their fathers. The assessment of children’s sporting activities according to age revealed links between parental exercising and the engagement of older (15–16 years old), but not younger adolescents (13–14 years old). Analysis of sports motivation showed that competition motives were more important for boys than for girls. Fitness, well-being and appearance motives were more important for older adolescents (15–18 years old), while competition motives were more important for younger adolescents (13–14 years old). Research revealed the relationship between children’s sport motives and fathers’ exercise habits, while examination of mothers’ exercise revealed no difference.

Key words: Physical activity, sports participation, family association, sports motivation


           Key Points
  • Parental exercising significantly predicts adolescents’ engagement in sport. Daughter’s engagement in sport is related to both parents whereas son’s involvement in sport is related only to father’s exercise habits.
  • Regular exercising of both mother and father predicts 13 - 14-year-old adolescents’ engagement in sport. However, mother exercising is not related to older adolescents’ involvement in sport.
  • Research revealed the relation of adolescents’ sport motives and father’s exercising, and no differences were established depending on mother’s exercise habits.
 
 
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