Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
ISSN: 1303 - 2968   
Ios-APP Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
Androit-APP Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
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©Journal of Sports Science and Medicine (2014) 13, 731 - 735

Research article
Shuttle-Run Sprint Training in Hypoxia for Youth Elite Soccer Players: A Pilot Study
Hannes Gatterer1,2, , Marc Philippe1,2, Verena Menz1,2, Florian Mosbach1,2, Martin Faulhaber1,2, Martin Burtscher1,2
Author Information
1 Department of Sport Science, University Innsbruck, Austria
2 FIFA Medical Centre of Excellence, Austria

Hannes Gatterer
✉ Department of Sport Science, University Innsbruck, Fürstenweg 185, A-6020 Innsbruck, Austria
Email: Hannes.gatterer@uibk.ac.at
Publish Date
Received: 21-05-2014
Accepted: 25-06-2014
Published (online): 01-12-2014
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ABSTRACT

The purposes of the present study were to investigate if a) shuttle-run sprint training performed in a normobaric hypoxia chamber of limited size (4.75x2.25m) is feasible, in terms of producing the same absolute training load, when compared to training in normoxia, and b) if such training improves the repeated sprint ability (RSA) and the Yo-Yo intermittent recovery (YYIR) test outcome in young elite soccer players. Players of an elite soccer training Centre (age: 15.3 ± 0.5 years, height: 1.73 ± 0.07 m, body mass: 62.6 ± 6.6 kg) were randomly assigned to a hypoxia or a normoxia training group. Within a 5-week period, players, who were not informed about the hypoxia intervention, performed at least 7 sessions of identical shuttle-run sprint training either in a normal training room (FiO2 = 20.95%) or in a hypoxic chamber (FiO2 = 14.8%; approximately 3300m), both equipped with the same floor. Each training session comprised 3 series of 5x10s back and forth sprints (4.5m) performed at maximal intensity. Recovery time between repetitions was 20s and between series 5min. Before and after the training period the RSA (6 x 40m shuttle sprint with 20 s rest between shuttles) and the YYIR test were performed. The size of the chamber did not restrict the training intensity of the sprint training (both groups performed approximately 8 shuttles during 10s). Training in hypoxia resulted in a lower fatigue slope which indicates better running speed maintenance during the RSA test (p = 0.024). YYIR performance increased over time (p = 0.045) without differences between groups (p > 0.05). This study showed that training intensity of the shuttle-run sprint training was not restricted in a hypoxic chamber of limited size which indicates that such training is feasible. Furthermore, hypoxia compared to normoxia training reduced the fatigue slope during the RSA test in youth soccer players.

Key words: Altitude training, football, high intensity training, repeated sprint ability, Yo-Yo test


           Key Points
  • Shuttle-run sprint training is feasible in hypoxic chambers of limited size (i.e., 4.75x2.25m).
  • Hypoxia sprint training (RSH), in comparison to normoxia training, might lead to better running speed maintenance during the repeated sprint ability test.
 
 
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