Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
ISSN: 1303 - 2968   
Ios-APP Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
Androit-APP Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
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©Journal of Sports Science and Medicine (2016) 15, 126 - 130

Research article
The Total Work Measured During a High Intensity Isokinetic Fatigue Test Is Associated With Anaerobic Work Capacity
Laurent Bosquet1,2, , Kenan Gouadec2, Nicolas Berryman1,3,4, Cyril Duclos5,6, Vincent Gremeaux7,8, Jean Louis Croisier9
Author Information
1 Laboratory MOVE (EA6314), Faculty of Sports Science, University of Poitiers, Poitiers, France
2 Department of Kinesiology, Université de Montréal, Montreal, Canada
3 Department of Sport Studies, Bishop’s University, Québec, Canada
4 National Institute of Sport, Montréal, Canada
5 Laboratory of Pathokinesiology, Center for Interdisciplinary Research in Rehabilitation, Montreal, Canada
6 School of Rehabilitation, Faculty of Medicine, Université de Montréal, Montreal, Canada
7 Plateforme d’Investigation Technologique, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, Dijon cedex, France
8 Faculty of Sport Sciences, University of Bourgogne, Dijon cedex, France
9 Department of Motricity Sciences, University of Liege, Belgium

Laurent Bosquet
✉ Laboratory MOVE (EA6314), University of Poitiers, 8, allée Jean Monnet, TSA 31113, 86073 Poitiers cedex 9, France
Email: laurent.bosquet@univ-poitiers.fr
Publish Date
Received: 22-10-2015
Accepted: 12-12-2015
Published (online): 23-02-2016
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ABSTRACT

The purpose of the study was to determine whether total work measured during a high intensity isokinetic fatigue test (TWFAT) could be considered as a valid measure of anaerobic work capacity (AWC), such as determined by total work measured during a Wingate Anaerobic Test (TWWAnT). Twenty well-trained cyclists performed 2 randomly ordered sessions involving a high intensity isokinetic fatigue test consisting in 30 reciprocal maximal concentric contractions of knee flexors and extensors at 180°·s-1, and a Wingate Anaerobic Test. We found that TWFAT of knee extensors was largely lower than TWWAnT (4151 ± 691 vs 22313 ± 2901 J, respectively, p < 0.05, Hedge’s g = 4.27). Both measures were highly associated (r = 0.83), and the 95% limits of agreement (LoA) represented 24.5% of TWWAnT. TWFAT of knee flexors (2151 ± 540 J) was largely lower than TWWAnT (p < 0.05, g = 9.52). By contrast, both measures were not associated (r = 0.09), and the 95% LoA represented 31.1% of TWWAnT. Combining TWFAT of knee flexors and knee extensors into a single measure (6302 ± 818 J) did not changed neither improved these observations. We still found a large difference with TWWAnT (p < 0.05, g = 5.26), a moderate association (r = 0.65) and 95% LoA representing 25.5% of TWWAnT. We concluded that TWFAT of knee extensors could be considered as a valid measure of AWC, since both measure were highly associated. However, the mean difference between both measures and their 95% LoA were too large to warrant interchangeability.

Key words: Isokinetic dynamometry, muscle fatigue, Wingate anaerobic test, cyclists, physiological assessmen


           Key Points
  • Total work performed during a high intensity isokinetic fatigue test can be considered as a valid measure of anaerobic work capacity (as determined by total work performance during a 30-s Wingate anaerobic test).
  • The 95% limits of agreement are two large to allow a direct comparison between both measures. In other words, it is not possible to estimate the magnitude of performance improvement during a 30-s Wingate anaerobic test from that observed during a high intensity isokinetic fatigue test.
  • In addition to provide sport scientists and coaches with measures of peak torque and ratios between agonists and antagonists muscles in a perspective of injury prevention, isokinetic dynamometry can also be used in the physiological assessment of athletes. However, some precautions should be taken in the interpretation of data.
 
 
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