Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
ISSN: 1303 - 2968   
Ios-APP Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
Androit-APP Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
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©Journal of Sports Science and Medicine (2016) 15, 254 - 262

Research article
Plantar Pressures During Long Distance Running: An Investigation of 10 Marathon Runners
Erik Hohmann1,2, , Peter Reaburn3, Kevin Tetsworth4, Andreas Imhoff1
Author Information
1 Department of Orthopaedic Sports Medicine, University of Technology, Munich, Germany
2 Musculoskeletal Research Unit, Central Queensland University, Rockhampton, Australia
3 Exercise and Sports Sciences, School of Medical and Applied Sciences, Central Queensland University, Rockhampton, Australia
4 Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Royal Brisbane Hospital, Herston, Australia

Erik Hohmann
✉ Musculoskeletal Research Unit, Central Queensland University, PO Box 4045, Rockhampton QLD 4700, Australia
Email: ehohmann@optusnet.com.au
Publish Date
Received: 30-11-2015
Accepted: 18-02-2016
Published (online): 23-05-2016
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ABSTRACT

The objective of this study was to record plantar pressures using an in-shoe measuring system before, during, and after a marathon run in ten experienced long-distance runners with a mean age of 37.7 ± 11.5 years. Peak and mean plantar pressures were recorded before, after, and every three km during a marathon race. There were no significant changes over time in peak and mean plantar pressures for either the dominant or non-dominant foot. There were significant between foot peak and mean plantar pressure differences for the total foot (p = 0.0001), forefoot (p = 0.0001), midfoot (p = 0.02 resp. p = 0.006), hindfoot (p = 0.0001), first ray (p = 0.01 resp. p = 0.0001) and MTP (p = 0.05 resp. p = 0.0001). Long-distance runners do not demonstrate significant changes in mean or peak plantar foot pressures over the distance of a marathon race. However, athletes consistently favoured their dominant extremity, applying significantly higher plantar pressures through their dominant foot over the entire marathon distance.

Key words: Marathon running, in-shoe pressure insoles, plantar pressure, foot dominance


           Key Points
  • Fatigue does not increase foot pressures
  • Every runner has a dominant foot where pressures are higher and that he/she favours
  • Foot pressures do not increase over the distance of a marathon run
 
 
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