Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
ISSN: 1303 - 2968   
Ios-APP Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
Androit-APP Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
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©Journal of Sports Science and Medicine (2018) 17, 134 - 144

Research article
Individual Responsiveness to Exercise-Induced Fat Loss and Improvement of Metabolic Profile in Young Women is Associated with Polymorphisms of Adrenergic Receptor Genes
Agata Leońska-Duniec1, Zbigniew Jastrzębski1, Aleksandra Jażdżewska1, Waldemar Moska1, Ewelina Lulińska-Kuklik1, Marek Sawczuk1, Svetlana I. Gubaydullina2, Alsu T. Shakirova3, Pawel Cięszczyk4, Adam Maszczyk5, Ildus I. Ahmetov6,7, 
Author Information
1 Faculty of Tourism and Recreation, Gdansk University of Physical Education and Sport, Gdansk, Poland
2 Sport Technology Research Centre, Volga Region State Academy of Physical Culture, Sport and Tourism, Kazan, Russia
3 Department of Propaedeutics of Childhood Diseases, Kazan State Medical University, Kazan, Russia
4 Faculty of Physical Education, Gdansk University of Physical Education and Sport, Gdansk, Poland
5 Department of Theory and Practice of Sport; Academy of Physical Education in Katowice, Poland
6 Sports Genetics Laboratory, St Petersburg Research Institute of Physical Culture, St Petersburg, Russia
7 Laboratory of Molecular Genetics, Kazan State Medical University, Kazan, Russia

Ildus I. Ahmetov
✉ Kazan State Medical University, 6/30, Tolstoy Street, 420015, Kazan, Russia
Email: genoterra@mail.ru
Publish Date
Received: 20-11-2017
Accepted: 15-01-2018
Published (online): 01-03-2018
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ABSTRACT

The effectiveness of physical exercise on fat loss and improvement of aerobic capacity varies considerably between individuals. A strong linkage exists between common allelic variants of the adrenergic receptor genes and weight gain, as well as changes in body composition. Therefore we aimed to check if body composition and metabolic variables were modulated by the ADRB2 (Gly16Arg and Glu27Gln), ADRB3 (Trp64Arg) and ADRA2A (rs553668 G/A) gene polymorphisms in 163 Polish sedentary women (age 19-24; body mass index (BMI) 21.7 ± 0.2 kg·m-2) involved in a 12-week aerobic training program. Only 74.8% of participants lost fat mass. On average, participants lost 5.8 (10.4)% of their relative fat mass with training (range: +28.3 to -63.6%). The improvement of VO2max was significantly greater in women who could lose their fat mass compared to women who were unsuccessful in fat loss (4.5 (5.6)% vs. 1.5 (3.8)%; p = 0.0045). The carriers of a low number (0-3) of obesity-related risk alleles (ADRB2 Gly16, ADRB2 Glu27, ADRA2A rs553668 G) were more successful in fat mass loss compared to the carriers of a high number (5-6) of risk alleles (7.7 (9.8) vs 4.0 (9.4)%, p = 0.0362). The presented results support the assumption that variation within adrenergic receptor genes contributes to interindividual changes of body composition in response to physical exercise.

Key words: ADRB2, ADRB3, ADRA2A, polygenic, obesity, fat, HDL


           Key Points
  • There is a wide range of individual variability in the change of relative fat mass and BMI in response to a 12-week aerobic training program.
  • The efficiency of fat loss was inversely correlated with the improvement of VO in response to a 12-week aerobic training.
  • The carriers of a low number of obesity-related risk alleles were more successful in fat mass loss compared to the carriers of a high number of risk alleles.
 
 
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