Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
ISSN: 1303 - 2968   
Ios-APP Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
Androit-APP Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
Views
1734
Download
867
 
©Journal of Sports Science and Medicine (2023) 22, 760 - 768   DOI: https://doi.org/10.52082/jssm.2023.760

Research article
Adaptations to Optimized Interval Training in Soccer Players: A Comparative Analysis of Standardized Methods for Individualizing Interval Interventions
Lu Dai1, Bixia Xie1,2, 
Author Information
1 Institute of Physical Education, Central South University of Forestry and Technology, Changsha, Hunan, China
2 Academic of forestry, Central South University of Forestry and Technology, Changsha, China

Bixia Xie
✉ Institute of Physical Education, Central South University of Forestry and Technology, Changsha 410004, Hunan, China
Email: xiebixia566@hotmail.com
Publish Date
Received: 01-09-2023
Accepted: 06-11-2023
Published (online): 01-12-2023
 
 
ABSTRACT

Accurately prescribing supramaximal interval training facilitates targeting desired physiological adaptations. This study compared the homogeneity of adaptations in cardiorespiratory parameters to supramaximal [i.e., intensities beyond maximal aerobic speed (MAS)] interval interventions prescribed using anaerobic speed reserve (ASR), the speed attained at the end of 30-15 Intermittent Fitness Test (VIFT), and MAS. Using repeated-measures factorial design, and during the off-season phase of the athletes’ yearly training cycle, thirty national-level soccer players (age = 19 ± 1.6 years; body mass = 78.9 ± 1.6 kg; height = 179 ± 4.7 cm; Body fat = 11 ± 0.9%) were randomized to interventions consisting of 2 sets of 6, 7, 8, 7, 8, and 9-min intervals (from 1st to 6th week), including 15 s running at Δ%20ASR (MAS + 0.2 × ASR), 120%MAS, or 95%VIFT followed by 15 s passive recovery. All ASR, VIFT, and MAS programs sufficiently stimulated adaptive mechanisms, improving relative maximal oxygen uptake [V̇O2max (p < 0.05; ES = 1.6, 1.2, and 1.1, respectively)], absolute V̇O2max (p < 0.05; ES = 1.5, 1.1, and 0.7), ventilation [V̇E (p < 0.05; ES = 1.6, 1.1, and 1.1)], O2 pulse [V̇O2/HR (p < 0.05; ES = 1.4, 1.1, and 0.6)], first and second ventilatory threshold [VT1 (p < 0.05; ES = 0.7, 0.8, and 0.7) and VT2 (p < 0.05; ES = 1.1, 1.1, and 0.8)], cardiac output [Q̇max (p = 1.5, 1.0, and 0.7)], and stroke volume [SVmax (p < 0.05; ES = 0.9, 0.7, and 0.5)]. Although there was no between-group difference for the change in the abovementioned variables over time, supramaximal interval training prescribed using ASR and VIFT resulted in a lower coefficient of variation [CV (inter-individual variability)] in physiological adaptations compared to exercise intensity determined as a proportion of MAS. Expressing the intensity of supramaximal interval programs according to the athlete’s ASR and VIFT would assist in accurately prescribing interventions and facilitate imposing mechanical and related physiological stimulus according to the athletes’ physiological ceiling. Such an approach leads to identical stimulation across athletes with differing profiles and potentially facilitates more homogenized adaptations.

Key words: Intermittent exercise, individualized intervention, cardiac function, maximal oxygen consumption, exercise prescription


           Key Points
  • Expressing the intensity of supramaximal HIIT according to the athlete’s ASR and VIFT resulted in accurately prescribing interventions and normalizes mechanical stimulus according to the athletes’ physiological ceiling.
  • Such individualization ensures the creation of more identical physiological demands across athletes with different profiles and facilitates the same degrees of physiological adaptations.
  • Irrespective of the homogeneity of the adaptations to these HIIT interventions, all three methods sufficiently stimulated adaptive mechanisms and improved cardiorespiratory fitness in well-trained soccer players.
 
 
Home Issues About Authors
Contact Current Editorial board Authors instructions
Email alerts In Press Mission For Reviewers
Archive Scope
Supplements Statistics
Most Read Articles
  Most Cited Articles
 
  
 
JSSM | Copyright 2001-2024 | All rights reserved. | LEGAL NOTICES | Publisher

It is forbidden the total or partial reproduction of this web site and the published materials, the treatment of its database, any kind of transition and for any means, either electronic, mechanic or other methods, without the previous written permission of the JSSM.

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.