Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
ISSN: 1303 - 2968   
Ios-APP Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
Androit-APP Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
Views
1358
Download
704
 
©Journal of Sports Science and Medicine (2024) 23, 107 - 113   DOI: https://doi.org/10.52082/jssm.2024.107

Research article
The Ratio between Weekly Training and Match External Physical Loads in U17 Elite Youth Soccer Players: Implications for the Training Process
Jakub Kokstejn1, , Jindrich Vampola1, Martin Musalek2, Miroslav Grobar1, Petr Stastny1
Author Information
1 Department of Sport Games, Faculty of Physical Education and Sport, Charles University, Prague 6, Czech Republic
2 Department of Social Science Foundation in Kinanthropology, Faculty of Physical Education and Sport, Charles University, Prague 6, Czech Republic

Jakub Kokstejn
✉ Department of Sport Games, Faculty of Physical Education and Sport, Charles University, Jose Martiho 269/31, 16252 Prague 6, Czech Republic
Email: kokstejn@ftvs.cuni.cz
Publish Date
Received: 03-01-2023
Accepted: 12-12-2023
Published (online): 01-03-2024
 
 
ABSTRACT

Research on the external physical load on elite youth soccer players during the weekly training microcycle in competitive periods and official matches is limited. The aims of this study were twofold: a) investigate possible differences in external physical load (PL) across player positions in U17 elite youth soccer players during official matches; b) determine the weekly training to match physical load ratio (WTMLr) across player positions. The sample included 20 outfield players from an elite soccer academy (mean age 15.94 ± 0.25 years) playing in four positions: central defender (CD), full-back (FB), central midfielder (CM) and Striker (S). Data were collected during the spring in-season period for 17 official matches played in a 4-3-3 game format. Indicators of external physical load monitored were: total distance (TD); total distance in high-speed running (HSR; > 16.1 km.h-1); total distance in sprint running (SPR; > 21.6 km.h-1); and relative physical load intensity (%HSR). The WTMLr was calculated for TD, HSR, SPR and %HSR as the ratio of the average weekly sum of training PL to the average sum of PL in an official match for a given players' position. Collectively, the training intensity during a one-week microcycle (%HSR in WTMLr) achieved only 76 % of match demands. CD performed significantly lower in all measured indicators of external PL during the official match than all other positions (p < 0.05; g > 0.80) except for TD in S. S achieved significantly higher SPR during official matches compared to CD (p < 0.05; g > 0.80), CM, and FB (g > 0.80). In contrast, CD reported higher WTMLr (medium-large effect size) in HSR and SPR indicators than all other positions. CM performed significantly higher %HSR in WTMLr than S and FB (p < 0.05; g > 0.80). Results revealed insufficient training intensity relative to match demands and, at the same time, weekly training PL did not meet match demands (especially in HSR and SPR) for players across the different positions. Therefore, practitioners should select appropriate training methods (drills and games) to ensure sufficient training intensity (HSR and SR metrics) and consider using the WTMLr, which can be used to help optimise and individualise training PL for different player positions.

Key words: GPS monitoring, physical workload, individualisation, training, performance, youth


           Key Points
  • Using weekly training to match physical load ratio (WTMLr), the weekly training intensity (% high-speed running) achieved only 76 % of the match demands.
  • The match demands regarding all measured physical load indicators were position-dependent in young elite soccer players aged 15 to 16.
  • Central defenders (CD) performed significantly lower distances than other playing positions in all measured physical load indicators during the match. In contrast, CD reported the highest values for WTMLr in high-speed running and sprints.
  • Practitioners need to use appropriate training methodology to replicate match intensity in training sessions during a weekly microcycle and should consider using the WTMLr to help optimise and individualise weekly training.
 
 
Home Issues About Authors
Contact Current Editorial board Authors instructions
Email alerts In Press Mission For Reviewers
Archive Scope
Supplements Statistics
Most Read Articles
  Most Cited Articles
 
  
 
JSSM | Copyright 2001-2024 | All rights reserved. | LEGAL NOTICES | Publisher

It is forbidden the total or partial reproduction of this web site and the published materials, the treatment of its database, any kind of transition and for any means, either electronic, mechanic or other methods, without the previous written permission of the JSSM.

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.